One writer’s random learnings from 2019

Writer at work

As with every year there is much to learn, even if it’s I have a tendency to keep repeating my mistakes. Anyway, here’s a few of the random ramblings I’ve picked up from 2019:

1. Having that series definitely sells more books, even if it’s not as many as I would like.

2. I struggle persuading people to leave reviews.

3. Starting an Amazon ad campaign is harder than you think.  Not the creating, just pressing “GO”

4. Have I run out of blog ideas?  Guess not.

5. The minute you press publish you’ll find another typo.

6. English in the media is getting worse e.g.: “They was great”, “he were…”, “It was took from the wrong place”.  Is it just me?

7. Golf is a game for masochists.  I must be one.

8. The newer the golf ball the more likely you are to lose it.

9. Even craft beer can give you a hangover….

10. ….as can good red wine.

11. Your characters develop a life of their own.  Sometimes alarmingly so.

12. The world may be round but life certainly doesn’t roll straight.

13. Science doesn’t have all the answers – but given time who knows?

14. Apparently we’re all a few percent Neanderthal.  I think it’s the part of me that plays golf.

15. As Inspector Kirby would say, “Never dismiss something on the grounds that it just doesn’t feel right.”  In his experience “things not feeling right often lead to things not being right.”

16. And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.” – Roald Dahl

A great feeling

17. Sometimes even your best friends don’t read your books – why not?

18. Adverbs are not evil but they do have a habit of creeping in unexpectedly… Damn!

19. You can’t trust politicians – who would have guessed?

20. Writing is addictive – I’ve been an addict for ten years.  Is there any cure?

23. Coffee is a writer’s friend.  But like all friends you can have too much of a good thing.

24. Making sourdough bread is an art not a science.

25. Lots of people out there have the answer to marketing your books – for a price.

26. If the world was the size of a billiard ball it would be smoother than one.

27. It can rain forever (or at least seem like it).

28. I can get writer’s block, or at least a bit stuck with a plot.  I then started writing random chapters which got me going again.

29. I never get quite as much done in my writing year as a I plan/hope to.  Life gets in the way sometimes – Oh and holidays of course, then there’s those summer days where it’s too good to be stuck inside and there’s cricket on the TV and ……….

30. ….. I’m amazed I get as much done as I do.

31. Your latest book is always the best one yet.

32. Even after 10 years writing I still have more ideas for books than I’ll ever have time to write.

33. Indie authors are a generous bunch of people – always willing to share ideas and experiences.

Steady progress

34. Keyboards are great crumb collectors.  For some reason I’ve just turned mine up-side-down and shaken it, mistake.

35. I am capable of losing anything.

36. Every year there are so many new delights to experience.

37. I’ve two follow up books written to my first novel, which I’ve revised.  For at least three years I’ve been planning to complete the revisions and publish them, then a new project takes over.  Maybe 2020 is their year.

So there it it is, 2019 is almost done and we’re heading into a new (for me writing) decade. As always I’m looking forward to coming up with more stories and hopefully persuading more people to read them.

Season’s greetings to all…

Oh, and as always comments are welcome.

Ian Martyn

Author: Ian Martyn

Science Fiction Writer

5 thoughts on “One writer’s random learnings from 2019”

  1. I can identify with many of those, number 5 in particular made me laugh – so true!
    Here’s to a good and productive new writing decade – I too have ideas for far more books than I think I shall ever finish, but I’m darned well going to try!

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